Fairy Tale by Stephen King

Book summary of Fairy Tale by Stephen King

Fairy Tale is a novel by Stephen King. King spends about a third of the book explaining its title, which is not ironic at all. The story is a fantasy adventure. While it starts out as a horror thriller, it quickly pivots to fantasy territory. In that respect, it has more in common with the Dark Tower series than with other King novels.

Setting

Stephen King is a prolific author of horror and fantasy novels, short stories, and other fiction. He is known for his masterful world-building and the ability to place readers within a specific time and place. Regardless of genre, he is an expert at sketching in all the small details so that they become fully realized in the final story.

King’s Fairy Tale draws on classic stories from different cultures. It includes elements from the Wizard of Oz, The Neverending Story’s Fantasia, and HP Lovecraft. While the world of the Fairy Tale is quite realistic, the story also explores the eerie atmosphere of a fanciful world where good and evil are at war.

King’s style of writing helps the tale seem eerily real. While he does use the first-person narration in this book, he manages to make it more warm and inviting. The story is also fraught with touches of the macabre, although the most frightening villains are not King’s own creations. In addition, the novel could use a few more editing touches, especially since it doesn’t get going until about 200 pages.

“Fairy Tale” by Stephen King is a novel that combines fantasy and horror themes. It begins as a slow-burn slice-of-life story that gradually turns into an overly simple fantasy tale, with plenty of nods to old tales. King has a knack for creating a world where readers can dream and then wake up with nightmares.

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